Tuesday, 30 of May of 2017

Lapis Lazuli Rough

Great deals on Lapis Lazuli Rough and other uncut stones. See our specially selected offers below to find the best buys for your Lapis Lazuli Rough online today.


5mm Natural Rough Cut Single Strand Lapis Lazuli Bracelet 8 1
5mm Natural Rough Cut Single Strand Lapis Lazuli Bracelet 8 1
$10.00
Time Remaining: 40m
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155 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A250
155 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A250
$6.99
Time Remaining: 1h 10m

Natural lapis lazuli quartz crystal rough polished gravel specimen
Natural lapis lazuli quartz crystal rough polished gravel specimen
$3.07 (3 Bids)
Time Remaining: 1h 57m

100 NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI CRYSTAL Lots Rough Specimen NICE 50g AS4
100 NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI CRYSTAL Lots Rough Specimen NICE 50g AS4
$0.99
Time Remaining: 2h 24m

435 Ct 100 Natural Superb Uncut Lapis Lazuli Rough Golden Flakes Loose Gemstone
435 Ct 100 Natural Superb Uncut Lapis Lazuli Rough Golden Flakes Loose Gemstone
$9.99
Time Remaining: 2h 34m

358 Ct 100 Natural Genuine Uncut Lapis Lazuli Rough Golden Flakes Gemstone
358 Ct 100 Natural Genuine Uncut Lapis Lazuli Rough Golden Flakes Gemstone
$9.99
Time Remaining: 2h 36m

340 Ct 100 Natural Glamorous Uncut Lapis Lazuli Rough Golden Flakes Gemstone
340 Ct 100 Natural Glamorous Uncut Lapis Lazuli Rough Golden Flakes Gemstone
$9.99
Time Remaining: 2h 39m

Crystal Allies Materials 1lb Bulk Rough Lapis Lazuli Stones from Afghanistan
Crystal Allies Materials 1lb Bulk Rough Lapis Lazuli Stones from Afghanistan
$26.00
Time Remaining: 2h 40m
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1515 Ct 100 Natural Glamorous Uncut Lapis Lazuli Rough Golden Flakes Gemstone
1515 Ct 100 Natural Glamorous Uncut Lapis Lazuli Rough Golden Flakes Gemstone
$39.99
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460 Ct 100 Natural Rarebit Uncut Lapis Lazuli Rough Golden Flakes Gemstone
460 Ct 100 Natural Rarebit Uncut Lapis Lazuli Rough Golden Flakes Gemstone
$9.99
Time Remaining: 2h 44m

157 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A204
157 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A204
$6.99
Time Remaining: 3h 33m

243 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A118
243 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A118
$10.99
Time Remaining: 3h 33m

618 Grams Two Lapis Lazuli Lazurite Slice Slab Cab Cabochon Gem Rough T3A53
618 Grams Two Lapis Lazuli Lazurite Slice Slab Cab Cabochon Gem Rough T3A53
$18.99
Time Remaining: 3h 58m
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168 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A170
168 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A170
$7.99
Time Remaining: 4h 11m

144 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A374
144 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A374
$6.99
Time Remaining: 4h 11m

124 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A264
124 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A264
$5.99
Time Remaining: 4h 21m

193 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A180
193 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A180
$9.99
Time Remaining: 4h 21m

195 CT 100 NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA GEMSTONE A60
195 CT 100 NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA GEMSTONE A60
$9.99
Time Remaining: 4h 21m

Rough Lapis Lazuli 925 Sterling Silver Jewelry Vintage Style Ring Size 75B3
Rough Lapis Lazuli 925 Sterling Silver Jewelry Vintage Style Ring Size 75B3
$1.85
Time Remaining: 4h 25m

147 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A434
147 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A434
$6.99
Time Remaining: 4h 40m

170 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A252
170 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A252
$7.99
Time Remaining: 4h 40m

153 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A284
153 CT NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI ROUGH SLABTILE UNTREATED AAA HOT GEMSTONE A284
$6.99
Time Remaining: 4h 41m

100 NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI CRYSTAL rough specimen 50g
100 NATURAL BLUE LAPIS LAZULI CRYSTAL rough specimen 50g
$0.99
Time Remaining: 4h 44m

101000 CT NATURAL LAPIS LAZULI CABOCHON ROUGH GEMSTONE RF 28
101000 CT NATURAL LAPIS LAZULI CABOCHON ROUGH GEMSTONE RF 28
$30.99
Time Remaining: 5h 1m
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Interesting Video About Lapis Lazuli Rough


Lapis Lazuli from mines of sar-e-sang Badakhshan, Afghanistan

Lapis Lazuli Rough

Natural gemstones

However certain rocks, (such as lapis lazuli) and organic materials (such as Amber or jet) are not minerals, but still used for jewelry, and therefore often regarded as natural gemstones as well. Most precious stones are hard, but some soft minerals are used in jewelry due to its brightness or other physical properties that have aesthetic value. Rarity is another feature that gives value to a gemstone. Besides jewelry, from ancient times until the 19th century engraved gems and carvings and cups were Hardstone large luxury art forms, the sculptures of Carl Faberge was the last major work in this tradition.

The traditional classification in the West, dating back to the ancient Greeks, begins with a distinction between precious and semiprecious stones, similar distinctions are made in other cultures. In modern usage precious stones are diamond, ruby, sapphire and emerald, with all the other gems to be semi-precious stones. This distinction is not scientific and reflects the rarity of the respective stones in antiquity, and their quality: they are all fine translucent color in its purest form, with the exception of colorless diamonds, and very hard, with hardness of 80-10 on the Mohs scale. Other stones are classified by their color, transparency and hardness. The traditional distinction does not necessarily reflect modern values ​​by example, while garnets are relatively inexpensive, called Tsavorite green garnet, can be much more valuable than a mid-quality emerald. Another scientific term semi-precious stones used in art history and archeology is Hardstone. The use of the words' beautiful 'and' semi-precious in a commercial context is not certainly misleading, since it apparently involves some stones are inherently more valuable than others, which is not the case.

In modern times Natural gemstones are identified by gemologists, who describe gems and their specific characteristics using technical terminology in the field of gemology. The first characteristic a gemologist uses to identify a gemstone is its chemical composition composition. For example, diamonds are made of carbon (C) and rubies of aluminum oxide (Al2O3). Then, many gems are crystals which are classified by crystal system such as cubic or trigonal or monoclinic. Another term used is habit, the shape of the gem is usually found in. For example, diamonds, which have a cubic crystal system, are often in octahedra.

There are no universally accepted classification systems for any gemstone other than white (colorless) diamond. Diamonds are graded using a system developed by the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) in the decade 1950. Historically, all gemstones are graded with the naked eye. The GIA system includes an important innovation, the introduction of 10x magnification as the standard classification of clarity. Other <a href=" "> http://www.gemandgemstone.com natural gemstones </ a> are still qualified with the naked eye (assuming a vision of 20/20).

A mnemonic device, the "four Cs" (color, cut, clarity and carat) has been introduced to help consumers understand the factors used for classification of a diamond. [8] With the modification of these categories can be useful in understanding the classification of all gemstones. The four criteria are weighted differently depending on whether they apply to colored gemstones or diamond colorless. In diamonds, cut is the main determinant of value followed by clarity and color. Diamonds are meant to shine, to break light into its rainbow colors iris constituents (scatter) brilliant cut them into pieces (scintillation) and submit it to the light (brightness). In its crystalline form in the rough, a diamond will do none of these things, is required for proper settings and it is this called "cut." In gemstones, color, including colored diamonds, is the purity and beauty that color is the main determinant of quality.

Physical characteristics that make a colored stone valuable are color, clarity lesser extent (emeralds will always have a number of inclusions), cut, unusual optical phenomena within the stone and color as zoning and Asteria (Star effects). The Greeks, for example, Asteria valuable gems, which were considered as a powerful love charm, and Helen of Troy was known for bringing star corundum.

Historically gemstones were classified into precious stones and semi-precious stones. Because this definition may change over time and vary with culture, has always been difficult to determine what constitutes precious stones.

Diamond has a wide band gap of 5.5 eV, corresponding to the ultraviolet wavelength of 225 nanometers deep. This means pure diamond should transmit visible light and appear as a colorless glass. Colors in the diamond come from defects in the network and impurities. The diamond lattice is exceptionally strong and only atoms nitrogen, boron and hydrogen can be introduced into diamond during growth in large concentrations (up to atomic percentages). Transition metals Ni and Co, which are commonly used for synthetic diamond growth using standard high pressure high temperature, have been detected in diamond as atoms individual, the maximum concentration is 0.01% for Ni [24] and even much less Co. Virtually any element can be introduced into the diamond by the implantation ion.

Nitrogen is by far the most common impurity found in gem diamonds. Nitrogen is responsible for yellow brown diamonds. Boron is responsible for colors.Color blue gray diamond has two sources: the radiation (usually by alpha particles) which causes the color of green diamonds, and plastic deformation of the diamond lattice. Plastic deformation is the cause of some brown color [26] and diamonds.In order maybe pink and red of rarity, colorless diamond, by far the most common, is followed by yellow and brown, by far the colors common, then the blue, green, black, translucent white, pink, purple, orange, purple, and the rarer red. "Black" or Carbonado, diamonds are not really black, but contain numerous dark inclusions that give the jewels of its dark side. Colored diamonds contain impurities or defects causing structural coloration, while pure or nearly pure diamonds are transparent and colorless. Most diamond impurities replace a carbon atom crystal lattice, known as a deficiency of carbon. The most common impurity, nitrogen, causes a deep yellow color light, depending on the type and concentration of nitrogen. [20] The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) grades diamonds low saturation yellow and brown like diamonds in the range normal color, and applies a rating scale of "D" (colorless) to Z (light yellow). Diamonds of a different color, like blue, are called fancy colored diamonds, and correspond to a different rating scale.

About the Author

I am Mohan read mathematics at Stanford and remained there for his MS. From 1998-1999 on researched in Evolution and in Animal Behavior in  Camrbidge, UK.

How much is pure Afgahn Lapis worth?

I have several rocks of it, some fairly large. Anyone know if there is a going rate for this stuff. It is real pretty when polished.

Here is a lapidary dealer that has a lot of Afghan Lapis Lazuli for sale. The rough specimens go from US$18.50 per ounce for small high grade samples, to US$4.50 per ounce for medium grade specimens.

http://www.mineralminers.com/html/laplrgh.stm

One seller I saw listed on eBay wanted US$19.55 per ounce (converted from kg/pound sterling).

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Afghan-Lapis-Lazuli-A-Massive-Rough-Stone-of-7-060kg_W0QQitemZ5016020608QQcategoryZ34075QQcmdZViewItem

In Pakistan, the mineral has a range of value reported as
"Gem dealers in Peshawar say the remaining stone is worth from $1 to $1,000 a kilogram, depending on quality." Converted that would be US$0.03 to US$28.35 per ounce. I imagine the higher end is more realistic outside of Afghanistan and Pakistan.
The source of this quote is from:

http://www.e-ariana.com/ariana/eariana.nsf/allDocsArticles/034D75E01223A2E587256C8A00552CE2?OpenDocument

It is a beautiful stone, that carves well, and was once used as pigment in paint, especially as paint around religious icons where the royal blue color indicated special status.

This is the Mindat.org site for lapis lazuli, which lists the rock properties, localities, photos, and also lists dealers who have the rock.

http://www.mindat.org/min-2330.html

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